The Duckling Rescue Drama A Smartphone Movie Adventure

Brown shaded banner with a faint human figure

I have been reviewing my movies and I discovered one I want to share because it shows how even as a beginner you can make a movie that tells a story.

In this post is the cats blogged in their own voices and I hope you will enjoy this review as proof that you can create your own movie when the situation suddenly turns dramatic!

The Duckling Adventure Story

Dad was working in his home office and he looked out of the window. Next door’s cat was peering down from the wall into the stream behind the garden. Uh-oh he thought, one of the Dash Kitten Crew might have fallen over the edge!  

He and Mum rushed outside, prepared to mount a dramatic cat rescue attempt but, instead, they found a lone duckling! Knowing that you do not touch wildlife without checking to see if their family is nearby, they assessed the situation.

  1. They checked carefully but could not see, or hear, family along our length of the stream.
  2. No sound or sight of ducks nearby.
  3. The little duckling was battling a fast stream and struggling.

A decision was made. Left to its own devices the tiny duckling risked being be swept quickly onwards to a weir, then to the Hutt River with no chance of landfall. A rescue was needed!

First Rescue Your Duckling 

The duckling was not easy to catch. For something so small, it was noisy, wriggly, and did its best to keep paddling like crazy. Dad caught it – and again, Mum and Dad listened carefully for the sound of ducks nearby – in the hope the family might locate the stray through its loud peeps. No duck appeared.

It was Sunday, so the chances of getting emergency advice from the NZSPCA was slim. So, Mum and Dad looked online and found the Duckman.  The site is comprehensive and helpful. It gave us a lot of help so we could take positive action for our orphan friend. We mounted a bird rescue. 

Duckling Rescue Adventure Cute Duckling sat in rescue crate
On our way to the Rescue. Note green binding so ducky can’t fly out the cat carrier.

Duckman aka Craig Shepherd, has a website full of important, life saving, information for ducks and seabirds. Mr Shepherd has worked in bird care, rehabilitation and rescue for over ten years and he was one of the bird rescuers thst made a huge difference to birdlife during the infamous Rena Oil Spill.

” I specialise in the rehabilitation of waterfowl but also take seabirds and some other breeds of birds as required.

The birds mostly come from the SPCA and vet clinics but I also get a few from the Wellington Zoo and Massey University for rehabilitation. The majority that come in are orphaned ducklings and I deal with 300 – 400 birds per year.”

With the duckling in a box, Mum and Dad checked on what to do next on the ‘Caring for Ducks’ page. Done right, the chances of a successful result were 98%. The duckling was moved to a carrier, and Dusty volunteered his microwaveable heat pad to provide extra warmth.

By the time this had been arranged, there had been a response from the Duckman rescue on Facebook. Mum and Dad were asked if they could bring the duckling to the rescue.  They had planned to head out to seeHidden Figuresat the cinema that evening (Mum has the book and found it a terrific read), but a hasty reschedule was arranged, then they set off for the rescue.

Our Duckling Smartphone Movie

After a winding, twisting, drive through a part of the Wellington area they had never seen before, Mum and Dad safely dropped off our little buddy and took a while to tour the rescue facility. 

Mum hastily grabbed her iPhone and shot some footage of the residents then made it into a movie for our post. NOTE For aspiring movie people – this was done on an iPhone, edited in iMovie, and it’s really cool!

P.S. We had a further message that our rescue duckling was eating and cuddling after we left too, so thank you Duckman for your skilled advice and care.

Driving Mr Dusty Video Showcase in Rivendell

Dusty's Rivendell Road Trip header

Our road trip cat driving Mr Dusty visits Rivendell.

The video only takes a brief two minutes of your time so, grab a mug of coffee, sit back and relax as we head to a magical corner of New Zealand; Lord of the Rings Country.

“Hello all, Dusty here with another trip to a corner of New Zealand many moviegoers may recognise from the silver screen.

Rivendell, in Lord of the Rings, is the home of Elven folk, and has a long and complex history. The ‘movie’ Rivendell, in particular, is noted for the scenes set during the Council of Elrond in The Fellowship of the Ring. 

The Council may sound like a dull meeting of exotic multi-species high ups; Elves, Humans, Dwarves and Hobbits, but it is here that, for the first time, the characters assemble to become the Fellowship of the Ring, which helps one small Hobbit destroy the evil ‘One Ring’.

Cute Dusty Cat visits Rivendell
Me at the Council of Elrond!

The movie location is now a gorgeous park and recreation area, Kaitoke Regional Park, which covers 2,860 hectares (11 sq. miles) of the foothills of the Tararua Ranges. It is popular with hikers, campers and those after a more gentle stroll.

The high, bush-clad hills, divide New Zealand’s Lower North Island roughly in two down a vertical. The western side is the Wairarapa wine and farming district, and the eastern side is the Kapiti coast area, a popular Summer holiday spot for beach holidays.

Rivendell Arch from LOTR
Check out the Departure Arch 1/2 scale from ‘Fellowship of the Ring’!

You can see me posing on top of my cosy purrito blanket on the front of the smaller scale model of the arch ‘through which the heroes depart’ to save the world! It was such awesome fun to visit and to feel the magic of this peaceful, and glorious, place.

I hope you enjoy our video, I am such a lucky cat to head out on these fabulous road trips and have you all along for the ride!”

How do I visit Rivendell?

Also known to Ring fans as Imladris, Rivendell means “deep valley of the cleft” there are places where you feel surrounded by high hills and deep river beds.

Kaitoke Regional Park covers 2860 hectares in the foothills of the Tararua Ranges, which are a range of spectacular hills that divide the Kapiti coast from the Wairarapa farming and winemaking areas.  Steep, bush-clad hills, and the Hutt River gorge make this a special place, and the centuries-old rata, rimu and beech forest are features in this gorgeous natural setting. You can camp here too!

Rivendell Arch from LOTR

Other Posts You Might Enjoy:

You cannot copy content of this page or use it to teach AI. © Marjorie Dawson © Dash Kitten
Verified by ExactMetrics